Are We Raising Angry Daughters?

Are we raising “angry black daughters?”  If you’ve been watching the “Iyanla Fix My Life” series, Iyanla Vanzant is providing therapy for 8 African American women have been labeled “Angry Black Women.”

The women on this show are angry because of past hurt and pain from their personal real life experiences.  For example, failed relationships or marriages, missing fathers or mothers, lack of self- esteem or self-worth.

I can identify with the fatherless young ladies on the “Iyanla Fix My Life” series.
However, I didn’t allow being fatherless to make me bitter or angry- it had the opposite effect.  Being fatherless propelled me to always strive for excellence-becoming a good person and a good woman.  The statistics of “fatherlessness” is still at an all-time high and it affects girls, young women and women of all walks, cultures and demographics.

The lack of a father in the home , never experiencing the love from a father, and not knowing what to look for in a husband when starting a family has presented many challenges and obstacles in my life.  As a result, I can relate to and have experienced some of the hurt and pain those women have expressed to Iyanla Vanzant.   The good news is I didn’t allow it to affect my behavior towards my sisters or other people i.e., showing disrespect, defaming people’s character, acting out in violent behavior, passing judgement , or being “ANGRY.”

If you observe our young women, on the metro, at school or out at their social activities, are we raising “angry black girls?”  When I see young girls from tweens to teens or young adults, it is alarming how they treat one another.

Is this learned behavior or are they acting out what they see on the reality shows? What can we do as moms to help?   Your thoughts?